acorn barnacle

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acorn barnacle

[′ā‚kȯrn ‚bär·nə·kəl]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of the sessile barnacles that are enclosed in conical, flat-bottomed shells and attach to ships and near-shore rocks and piles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The GUI was developed using PyQt5 to facilitate the flow of the algorithm, namely, recognition of macrofouling organisms by OpenCV, classification of macrofouling organisms via CNN model, and lastly the percent of acorn barnacle fouling.
And although stone crabs consistently consumed both bivalve prey and acorn barnacles, both 1- and 2-clawed stone crabs consumed more bivalves than barnacles (Z = 8.41, P < 0.0001).
Other types of acorn barnacles include the crab barnacle (Chelonibia patula), which often attaches itself to crabs, and the crenate barnacle (B.
Intraspecific competition and facilitation in a northern acorn barnacle population.
KEY WORDS: acorn barnacle, aquaculture, southern Chile, cash flow, economic indicators
The results of this study show that while high recruitment in acorn barnacles can lead to heavy mortality, crowding can also benefit barnacles by enhancing feeding success and minimizing skeletal support costs.
The subsequent colonization by acorn barnacles (three species) and mussels (two species) was manipulated by either allowing them settle naturally (present) or removing the newly colonized individuals on a monthly basis (absent).
Cement proteins of the acorn barnacle, Megabalanus rosa.
In the more derived acorn barnacles (e.g., Balanus tintinnabulum, Elminius modestus, and Chelonibia testudinaria), a secretory (synthesis) and a storage (aggregation) region can be distinguished in the cytoplasm of the gland cell (Lacombe and Liguori, 1969; Lacombe, 1970; Walker, 1970, 1978).
Acorn barnacles provide an excellent opportunity for examining plastic response because they are sessile (and therefore cannot move in response to the environment), molt their exoskeleton (providing periodic opportunity for morphological change), and occur across a wide range of flow conditions.
The acorn barnacle (5) glues itself to a rock with its own strong glue.