acoustic emission


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acoustic emission

[ə′küs·tik ē′mish·ən]
(acoustics)
The phenomenon of transient elastic-wave generation due to a rapid release of strain energy caused by a structural alteration in a solid material. Also known as stress-wave emission.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between Concrete Crack Parameters and Acoustic Emission Released during Failure, Key Engineering Material 245-246: 461-466.
Research at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) addressing the design, use, and characterization of acoustic emission (AE) transducers (1-18) began in the 1970s in response to increasing needs of the nondestructive testing community.
The aim of this research is to propose and develop the in-process monitoring system to identify the cutting states of chip formation and chatter for the carbon steel (S45C) in CNC turning process by utilizing the sensor fusion, which are the force sensor, the sound sensor, the accelerometer sensor and the acoustic emission sensor via the neural network using the perceptron technique.
Acoustic emission is typically monitored with piezoelectric transducers that convert the displacement vibrations into electric pulses.
"On the Applicability of Acoustic Emission to Identify Modes of Damage in Full-scale Composite Fuselage Structures." Journal of Composite Materials 50 (4): 447-469.
However, the current statistical models of acoustic emission do not account for the effects of damage and fractal features on the constitutive equations of the materials, and the statistical models of acoustic emission are thus established without considering their effects.
According to the change of acoustic emission count (Figure 9(b)), the acoustic emission activities can be divided into the active period, the clam period, and the acute period.
Although the interpretation of the Kaiser point is the key to the acoustic emission method for in situ stress measurement, there are still some deficiencies in the interpretation of the Kaiser point, which seriously hinders the wide application of the method.
As the signal level will be highest close to the leak and lower the farther it is away, these upstream and downstream figures will be lower if the valve is truly the source of the acoustic emission. The reading is then inserted into a PC spreadsheet along with the other relevant information, such as valve inlet size, differential pressure across the valve and valve type.
Rock damage and rupture are accompanied by acoustic emission that consecutively monitors microcrack growth and effectively monitors and predicts engineering rock mass stability and rock burst [2-4].

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