acoustic energy


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acoustic energy

[ə′küs·tik ′en·ər·jē]
(acoustics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking advantage of acoustic energy flux characteristics in the spatial domain, we construct two variables of acoustic energy flux in the x and y channels of the AVH, defined as the steering acoustic energy flux.
In this paper, Ansys 18.2 software has been used to simulate acoustic energy distribution in a simple expansion chamber with helicoid.
The black dashed arrow indicates the travel trajectory of the acoustic energy.
Other features include: Bosch washer and dryer, high-performance acoustic energy efficient windows and solid core doors.
"It can also be coupled to a superconducting qubit made on the surface of the sapphire using a disk of aluminum nitride, which converts acoustic energy into electromagnetic energy and vice versa."
Ultrasound is acoustic energy considered a mechanical, nonionizing, nonpolluting type of energy [1], with great potential for use in production processes of high quality food products.
Thus, most acoustic energy will be transmitted from the left (the horn mouth) to the right open space, so the reflective acoustic waves will be much less.
Focusing of acoustic energy can be accomplished using reflectors [22], acoustic lenses [23], spherically curved transducers [24], or phased-array applicators [25].
AAEs) emit acoustic energy over very broad frequency spectrum [6,7]; thus it is expected that the AAEs would be readily detectable by both the human ear (sensitive from roughly 20 Hz to 20 kHz) and commercially-available AE transducers (sensitive from roughly 150 kHz to 675 kHz).