acoustic transponder

acoustic transponder

[ə′küs·tik tranz′pän·dər]
(navigation)
A device used in underwater navigation which, on being interrogated by coded acoustic signals, emits acoustic reply.
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The system uses the Ultra-Short BaseLine (USBL) method to calculate the position of a subsea target, in this case Thien Nam's ROV, by measuring the range and bearing from a vessel-mounted transceiver to an acoustic transponder mounted on the target.
It uses an acoustic transponder as the link between a subsea location and a vessel-based monitoring station.
Once the data acquisition phase is complete, Ranger 2 is then used to relocate the seabed receivers (each fitted with its own acoustic transponder) and issues a command to release the receiver which then floats to the surface for recovery and data retrieval.
In conventional Ultra-Short BaseLine (USBL) operating mode, Ranger 2 calculates the position of a subsea target, such an ROV or towfish, by measuring the range and bearing from a vessel-mounted transceiver to an acoustic transponder fitted to the target.
The system calculates the position of a subsea target by measuring the range and bearing from a vessel-mounted transceiver to an acoustic transponder fitted to the target.
Ranger 2 calculates the position of a subsea target by measuring the range and bearing from a vessel-mounted Ultra-Short BaseLine (USBL) transceiver to an acoustic transponder on the target.
The system calculates the position of a subsea target by measuring the range and bearing from a vessel-mounted transceiver to an acoustic transponder on the target, a technique known as Ultra-Short BaseLine (USBL) positioning.
Jeff Neasham, a senior lecturer at Newcastle University School of Engineering, said: "By attaching miniature, low-cost, subsea acoustic transponders to fishing nets or other gear, the aim is to be able to precisely locate lost gear from a search vessel and to investigate how underwater robots may be used to aid recovery where necessary.
Newcastle University's Jeff Neasham, a senior lecturer in the School of Engineering, said: "By attaching miniature, low-cost, subsea acoustic transponders to fishing nets or other gear, the aim is to be able to precisely locate lost gear from a search vessel and to investigate how underwater robots may be used to aid recovery where necessary.
Considering the 3D AOA localization problem of the underwater vehicle in Figure 1, where the vehicle at an undetermined location [mathematical expression not reproducible] is to be located by communicating with acoustic transponders at the fixed inertial location [mathematical expression not reproducible] (where N is the number of the acoustic transponders), using the azimuth and elevation angles.
Navigating by the same acoustic transponders Alvin uses, ABE took about two hours to reach the seafloor.

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