acquire

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acquire

[ə′kwīr]
(electronics)
Of acquisition radars, the process of detecting the presence and location of a target in sufficient detail to permit identification.
Of tracking radars, the process of positioning a radar beam so that a target is in that beam to permit the effective employment of weapons. Also known as target acquisition.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the sharing economy builds steam, collaborative consumption is becoming the name of the game instead of individual acquisitiveness. In their 2010 book, What's Mine Is Yours, Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers describe three distinct ways of participating in the sharing economy: 1) product service systems, which facilitate the sharing or renting of a product (such as car sharing); 2) redistribution markets, which enable the re-ownership of a product (Craigslist); or 3) collaborative lifestyles, in which assets and skills can be shared (coworking spaces).
Hoarding, as disordered acquisitiveness, as equivalent to the capital sin of avarice, ruptures and deadens our relationship with God.
* Poverty: The church in the spirit of Innocent III meant a church of wealth, pomp and circumstance, acquisitiveness and financial scandal.
Capitalism's defenders sometimes argue that the spirit of acquisitiveness is so deeply ingrained in human nature that nothing can dislodge it.
It must be mentioned that the ground had been cleared, on one hand, by the growth of unashamed acquisitiveness under the banner of laissez faire, laissez passer, and, on the other hand, by the triumph of the democratic principle.
Those questions have most often been asked of New England in the long shadow of Perry Miller's declension narrative, whereby the faith of the early Puritans gradually eroded before the onslaught of material acquisitiveness. Subsequent historians have argued some version of two spinoff positions: that religion kept the profit motive in check for a time, or that religious values stimulated the pre-revolutionary market economy.
Wheat farming gradually produced a stable society in which rising material prosperity created a rural middle class (and a social elite as well) that demonstrated increasing financial wherewithal through higher levels of material acquisitiveness. Thus, for example, in many cases, middle-class Abernethians replaced their roughly built wooden houses dating from the period of initial settlement with larger, architecturally stylish homes constructed of more durable building materials such as brick or stone.
Whereas French acquisitiveness in Italy and Egypt was spoliation and theft to British eyes, their own efforts were presented as altogether more noble.
Sombart, unlike Weber and Simmel was the sort of anti-Semite who attributed the acquisitiveness endemic in Uirn-of-the-century capitalist society to the personal characteristics of Jews.
As a collection dealing with images rather than texts, the editors have successfully surmounted the language barrier to let readers have direct access to the "sources." Most of the essays give enough cultural and historical context to communicate effectively with non-specialists and let the image "speak for itself." For example, Willard Sunderland's essay on the porcelain figures of "peoples of the Russian Empire" surely evokes both the inquisitiveness of the educated, upper-class Russians who owned them, as well as the acquisitiveness of the colonial project in a concrete way: instead of a porcelain shepherdess to decorate her shelf, the well-to-do Russian dame had a Samoyed reindeer herder, reproduced with ethnographic fidelity.
The left-hand, right-hand pair brought conflicting styles and batting strategies to the crease but accumulated runs with a similar sense of acquisitiveness Gambhir reached his 10th half century in Tests in 117 minutes from 97 balls with eight fours.
The propulsion to greed in an effort to control generates ravenous acquisitiveness, so that life becomes a passionate pursuit of every form of security and self-worth, most particularly through more money.