acrasia


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acrasia

[ə′krā·zē·ə]
(psychology)
Lack of self-control.

Acrasia

self-indulgent in the pleasures of the senses. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fountain provides one obvious link, but there are several others, and Duessa and Acrasia can be easily linked as femmes fatales.
According to Greenblatt's logic, then, Guyon is said to let Acrasia live, because he does not destroy her.
Part D is focussed on acrasia in Plato and Aristotle.
After transforming a group of beasts, malformed by Acrasia, back into men, the knight and his loyal Palmer come across one man "that had an hog beene late, hight Grylle by name" (2.
By contrast, Acrasia, the seductive witch of the Bower, "offers not simply sexual plea-sure--'long wanton joys'--but self-abandonment, erotic aestheticism, the melting of the will, the end of all quests; and Spenser understands, at the deepest level of his being, the appeal of such an end.
The distinction between continence and temperance is overlooked so that Acrasia, who stands for intemperance (a passionless state of wickedness), is linked with Amavia and Dido as examples of female figures overwhelmed by passion (p.
Lemmon, for instance, argued in 1962 that "it is so notorious a fact about human agents that they are often subject to acrasia that any ethical position that makes this seem queer or paradoxical is automatically suspect for just this reason.
One character, however, enjoys being the hog that Acrasia has made him.
Dame Cottitoe is also very reminiscent of the enchantress, Acrasia, in Spenser's "Bower of Bliss" (Book 11, Canto XII of Tire Faerie Queene).
The careful and artificial comfort of the setting--the loam for the grass trucked in, the sprinkler always running--seems to be a kind of affront to the severe landscape surrounding it, a kind of bower of bliss, a paradise of acrasia set in a fierce and fiercely earnest desert.
A popular allegorical figure in the lusty Renaissance (George Chapman's Homeric translation and commentary were echoed everywhere), Circe masqueraded in many different guises: Spenser's Acrasia and Milton's Eve are surely her echoes or doubles, no less than her son Comus.
The weak creature enters an abysmal darkness, as if in the clutches of Acrasia in her Bower of Bliss, whereas the chosen person becomes Sir Guyon reaching the apex of light in his quest for truth.