acre-foot


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acre-foot

[′ā·kər ′fu̇t]
(hydrology)
The volume of water required to cover 1 acre to a depth of 1 foot, hence 43,560 cubic feet; a convenient unit for measuring irrigation water, runoff volume, and reservoir capacity.

acre-foot

The amount of water required to cover an area of 1 acre to a depth of 1 foot; equivalent to 43,560 cubic feet (4046.9 m3); sometimes used as a measure of materials in place (e.g., gravel).
References in periodicals archive ?
During the early 2000s, the price skyrocketed from well under $10,000 per acre-foot to nearly $20,000 per acre-foot.
Also, irrigators entered into 16 one-year lease contracts with the Board of Water Works of Pueblo through a special lease offer of $20 per acre-foot.
We can produce local groundwater and treat it for less than $300 an acre-foot if we have somewhere to dispose of the salts,'' Hajas said.
Metropolitan would pay $250 per acre-foot for any additional water IID conserves, with the net proceeds from that sale -- estimated at up to $300 million -- going to help pay for the sea's restoration and environmental impacts to the Colorado River ecosystem.
The action comes after IID, San Diego and Coachella rejected a state proposal that would have paid for the transfer's environmental impacts through a user fee charged to each agency for every acre-foot of Colorado River water received.
QUARTZ HILL - Antelope Valley's water wholesaler has raised rates by $50 an acre-foot, citing increased electricity costs passed on by the State Water Project.
An acre-foot is nearly 326,000 gallons of water, about what two typical Southern California families use in and around their home in a year).
The first-year water cost would be about $560 an acre-foot and a 30-year normal cost of water about $680 an acre-foot - at least $400 more than imported water from Northern California, according to the CLWA Urban Water Management Plant.
Citing rising energy costs for pumping water, state water officials have informed the agency they are looking at raising their rates by $100 per acre-foot.
An acre-foot, filling an acre to a depth of one foot, is 325,900 gallons, about enough water to meet the needs of a family of four for one year.
An acre-foot is 325,851 gallons, or enough to supply an average-size Antelope Valley family for a year.
An acre-foot is nearly 326,000 gallons, about the amount of water used annually by two typical Southland families in and around their households.