acre-inch


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acre-inch

[′ā·kər ′inch]
(hydrology)
A unit of volume used in the United States for water flow, equal to 3630 cubic feet. Abbreviated acre-in.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Through careful research planned in cooperation with farmers and by adding newly successful techniques to the long-term rotation project--while dropping failures--they've answered these questions in dollars and cents and acre-inches of precious soil water saved, so Central Plains farmers really will care.--By Don Comis, ARS.
One part per million of an acre-inch of water then weighs (226,512 lb/ 1,000,000) = 0.226512 or 0.23 lb.
The volume of water is measured in acre-inches and the P concentration in runoff water in milligrams per liter.
Fortunately, growers are very careful with their water and don't apply more than 2 or 3 acre-inches per acre per season for vineyard-irrigation needs.
Sugarcane is a high delta crop and requires 80 to 90 acre-inches of water in Sindh and about 64-acre inch water in the Punjab.
Overall, it was very effective in suppressing Verticillium dahliae in soils, and it resulted in 85% to 100% of the marketable fruit yield observed with fumigated controls in coastal California strawberries when 9 tons per acre of rice bran was preplant incorporated and 3 to 4 acre-inches of irrigation was applied in sandy loam to clay loam soils (Shennan et al.
The plots were maintained above field capacity with intermittently applied irrigation water (total of 2.5 acre-inches) from Oct.
Overall, we probably use around 2 or 3 acre-inches a year for irrigation.