acropetal

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acropetal

[ə′krä·pəd·əl]
(botany)
From the base toward the apex, as seen in the formation of certain organs or the spread of a pathogen.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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However, a similar trend was observed for (i) the proportion of ear size reached at silking, (ii) the dynamic of spikelet and silk initiation, and (iii) the pattern of silk elongation, which was repetitive along the ear and acropetally delayed in time.
Freezing proceeded only acropetally in shoots and leaves, contrary to freezing events in barley and velvetgrass (Holcus lanatus L.) in which basipetal freezing also occurred (Pearce and Fuller, 2001).
He found that crude protein, in vitro organic matter digestibility, and mineral concentration increased acropetally on the shoot.
In the PCK clade (Reinheimer et al., 2009), the primary branches that are acropetally initiated show, in turn, acropetal initiation of the secondary branches; while in the inflorescences with basipetal initiation of the primary branches, the initiation of the secondary branches may be acropetal, basipetal or amphipetal.
Dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid), for example, is translocated acropetally in several species, the mechanism for which may or may not be phloem transport (A1-Khatib et al., 1992).
Each panicle consists of individual flowers that mature acropetally from the base to the top of the inflorescence (Findley et al., 1997).
Within a growing internode the youngest, undifferentiated tissues arise from the intercalary meristem (IM) at the base of the internode and become progressively more developed as they are "pushed" acropetally in the internode by new cells formed in the IM and by cell enlargement.
In spikelets with many flowers, the flowers develop acropetally (Figs.
In a few even more extreme examples, some condensed heads mature neither acropetally nor basipetally and thus seem to have no discernable pattern of maturation at all.
Plant age was determined by counting the number of nodes acropetally from the first node above the cotyledons to the last unfolded sepal pair.