acrophobia


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acrophobia

abnormal fear or dread of being at a great height

acrophobia

[‚ak·rə′fōb·ē·ə]
(psychology)
Abnormal fear of great heights.
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References in periodicals archive ?
[29, 30] compared AR technologies with VR for effectiveness in treating acrophobia, finding that AR and VR systems are equally capable of triggering fear of heights.
Subject entries include acrophobia, age of onset, cognitive bias modification, comorbidity, three pathways theory, and a wide variety of other related topics.
As Semele, Jane Archibald was utter joy to hear and see, even while her singer-unfriendly aerial act for "Endless Pleasure" was inducing acrophobia; and Katherine Whyte was a delight in her comic turn as Juno's put-upon sidekick, Iris.
Threat preys on your senses (and phobias) at every opportunity - from auditory hallucinations to vertigo and acrophobia. It's not a game to take lightly, but every death is not in vain in the world of Drangelic, merely preparing you better for your next attempt.
In Vertigo (1958), former police detective John ' Scottie' Ferguson is forced into early retirement after an incident causes him to develop Acrophobia (an extreme fear of heights).
DCS, an NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-receptor partial agonist approved as an antibacterial by the Food and Drug Administration, enhances exposure therapy for conditions that include social anxiety and acrophobia in previous studies.
--thoughts--coherent, reduced the ideatic flux, recurrent and persistent suicidal ideas, persecutory delusional thoughts, obsessive ideas regarding constant preoccupation for symmetry, orderliness, permanent checking, but without focus on any objects, phobic ideas like misophobia, nosophobia, acrophobia, arahnophobia, aihmophobia, agoraphobia, ablutomania.
Aviophobia, fear of flying, may be related exclusively to air travel, or may be related to other fears such as claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces); agoraphobia (fear of going out in public, especially when one cannot escape); acrophobia (fear of heights); or a fear of vomiting, terrorist attack, impending death, drowning, or simply a loss of control.
Stossel suffers from a wide range of phobias, "to name a few: enclosed spaces (claustrophobia); heights (acrophobia); fainting (asthenophobia); being trapped far from home (a species of agoraphobia); germs (bacillophobia); cheese (turophobia); flying (aerophobia); vomiting (emetophobia); and, naturally, vomiting while flying (aeronausiphobia).''
He proceeds to argue that asymmetrical knowledge allows Elster to manipulate Scottie, using Scottie's acrophobia, drinking habits, and tendency to stalk to ensure the success of his murder plot; a similar asymmetry moves Scottie to flee from Midge, who knows Scottie's trouble with intimacy all too well due to their college relationship and broken engagement.