acrylamide


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

acrylamide

[ə′kril·ə‚mīd]
(organic chemistry)
CH2CHCONH2 Colorless, odorless crystals with a melting point of 84.5°C; soluble in water, alcohol, and acetone; used in organic synthesis, polymerization, sewage treatment, ore processing, and permanent press fabrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acrylamide is a chemical compound that typically forms in starchy foods when they are baked, fried, or roasted.
Potato breeders and processors would like to have a quicker, less expensive method to test acrylamide levels.
To verify the role of plantain composition on the acrylamide formation a spiking experiment with asparagine was performed.
Researchers then fried some of the potatoes and observed how much acrylamide the potatoes formed.
It's not yet clear what a safe level of acrylamide might be for us, but the European Commission is now considering introducing maximum levels.
And using lower-temperature methods of cooking, such as boiling, steaming, and sauteing instead of frying or roasting starchy foods can reduce acrylamide, too.
These results indicate that TFO is not beneficial in regard to limiting acrylamide production in french fries.
Water treatment segment accounts for the largest share in the global acrylamide market which is followed by the oil and gas sector.
Many products containing acrylamide are now being manufactured with the intent of reducing residual monomer content.
Polyacrylamides of high commercial interest are copolymers of acrylamide (1, In Figure 1) with sodium or ammonium salts of acrylic acid (4) or 2-acrylamldo tert-butylsulfonic acid (ATBS) (5) to produce anionic polymers or with acryloyloxyethyltrimethylammonlum chloride (AETAC, 6), to produce cationic polymers.
The first part of the study tested three food chemicals: acrylamide, aluminium and perchlorates.