electrode

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electrode,

terminal through which electric current passes between metallic and nonmetallic parts of an electric circuit. In most familiar circuits current is carried by metallic conductors, but in some circuits the current passes for some distance through a nonmetallic conductor. For example, in electrolysiselectrolysis
, passage of an electric current through a conducting solution or molten salt that is decomposed in the process. The Electrolytic Process

The electrolytic process requires that an electrolyte, an ionized solution or molten metallic salt, complete an
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 current passes through a liquid electrolyte; in a fluorescent lamp current passes through a gas. An electrode is usually in the form of a wire, rod, or plate. It may be made of a metal, e.g., copper, lead, platinum, silver, or zinc, or of a nonmetal, commonly carbon. The electrode through which current passes from the metallic to the nonmetallic conductor is called the anode, and that through which current passes from the nonmetallic to the metallic conductor, the cathode. (Electron flow is in a direction opposite that of conventionally defined current.) In most familiar electric devices, current flows from the terminal at higher electric potential (the positive electrode) to the terminal at lower electric potential (the negative electrode); therefore, the anode is usually the positive electrode and the cathode the negative electrode. In some electric devices, e.g., an electric battery, nonelectric energy is converted to electric energy, causing current to flow within the device from the negative electrode to the positive electrode, so that the anode is the negative electrode and the cathode is the positive electrode.

Electrode

 

a structural component of an electronic, ion, or electrical engineering device or production apparatus. It consists of a conductor with a specific shape, which connects a section of an electric circuit in contact with a working medium—a vacuum (in the practical sense), gas, semiconductor, or liquid—to the remainder of the circuit (which is formed by conductors).

The electrodes of electronic devices (electron tubes, electronbeam instruments, semiconductor devices, and so on) are usually in the form of a plate, grid, cylinder, or the like. They have a wide variety of functions. For example, as cathodes and photocathodes, they act as sources of electrons; as grids (control, shield, and suppressor types) and the electrodes of electron guns, they are used to create within a device electric fields that control the motion of electrons and ions in the working medium; as anodes (plates), they collect electrons.


Electrode

 

in electrochemistry, a metal, oxide, or other electrical conductor in contact with an ionic conductor, such as an electrolytic solution or a fused electrolyte. The most important characteristic of electrodes is the electrode potential established at the electrode-electrolyte boundary. Depending on use, electrodes may be classified as reference, indicator, and other types. Systems of two different electrodes can be used as chemical sources of current; when direct current passes through such systems, they act as electrolytic cells.

electrode

[i′lek‚trōd]
(electricity)
An electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
One of the terminals used in dielectric heating or diathermy for applying the high-frequency electric field to the material being heated.

electrode

1. In arc welding, the component in a welding circuit through which an electric current is conducted between the electrode holder and the arc.
2.In resistance welding, the component through which the electric current in the welding machine passes (usually accompanied by pressure) directly to the work.

electrode

1. a conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolyte, an electric arc, or an electronic valve or tube
2. an element in a semiconducting device that emits, collects, or controls the movement of electrons or holes

electrode

A device that emits, controls or receives electricity. Typically an end point or wire made of metal or some composite material, there are countless electrodes in electrical and electronics products. For example, in a vacuum tube, the cathode emitter is a "negative" electrode. The transparent wires made of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) that cross an LCD screen are electrodes. See battery, air interface and cathode.
References in periodicals archive ?
Active electrode is electrodes that require no skin preparation.
Various types of active electrodes may be used for this type of test and as in full field ERGs the patient should be dilated.
Stimulation point (S1): The cathode was placed 8 cm proximal to the active electrode in a line measured first to the mid-point of the distal wrist crease and then to a point slightly ulnar to the tendon of the flexor carpi radialis.
For the active electrode 1 we determine potential by expression
In this approach, we first build an FEM model which contains influential tissue compartments in the head, neck and upper chest to compute the potential distribution [PHI] (x, y, z) on the boundary of an imaginary cube centered at the active electrode.
Evaluations Kalkwarf et al (11), Kalkwarf et al (12) monitored the energy output at the active electrode as well as the time and depth of electrosurgery incisions in human gingiva.
The active electrode and particular locating pin situated in the area of that electrode are related as particular pin appears in front of the highest amplitude vibration region, when that electrode is excited.
The large area of the patient return pad results in a lower current density than that of the active electrode (Hay 2007); the significance of this is explained later.
One challenge for electrode-based cell monitoring is the limitation that the passivation layer, which is deposited to cover the electrode and then later removed in specific regions to create the active electrode areas (i.
If an active electrode is used, then there is an additional design requirement to ensure that a sufficient amount of the reactive elements are chemically available for the desired dosing period.

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