active leg

active leg

[′ak·tiv ′leg]
(electronics)
An electrical element within a transducer which changes its electrical characteristics as a function of the application of a stimulus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
He had a fondness, half artistic, half affectionate, for little children--the smaller they were on tolerably active legs, and the funnier their clothing, the better Will liked to surprise and please them.
When the navigator is programmed with an active flight plan, the active leg is displayed onscreen in magenta and the next leg in the flight plan is depicted in an alternating (dashed) magenta and white line.
My flight plan now has KSAF SAF, which is the active leg, then the fixes on the approach starting with HEGMI.
The Lokomat, LokoHelp, Lopes, and Active Leg Exoskeleton (ALEX) belong to the typical treadmill-based exoskeleton robots.
All mites which died within 6 hours were considered as susceptible to drug, while mites having active leg movements even after 6 hours were considered as non-susceptible.
All mites which died within 5 hours had been declared as susceptible to drugs, while mites having active leg movements even after 5 hours of drug application were considered as non-susceptible.
Additionally, estimated time enroute (ETE), distance information, and the active leg of a flight plan are conveniently displayed just below the HSI.
Active Leg. Referring to Figure 2(a), the velocity [??] of the intermediate joint in ith leg is found by making use of the following equation:
A hand/foot-driven bike allows for passive or active leg exercise by enabling the rider to pedal with hands, feet, or both through synchronized hand/foot operation.
The active leg muscle contraction increases muscle stiffness and decreases postural stability during quiet stance.
--measuring the corresponding acceleration active leg movements and movements to achieve a similar acceleration of the leg resulted.
Mughal's research focuses on active leg prosthetics, and the complex bipedal mechanism he modeled involved 12 degrees-of-freedom and nine joints.