activity level


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activity level

[‚ak′tiv·əd·ē ′lev·əl]
(computer science)
The value assumed by a structural variable during the solution of a programming problem.
A measure of the number of times that use or modification is made of the information contained in a file.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because activity was so weak during the first three quarters of 2017, the activity level for the full year, for all age groups, fell 1.
The American Cancer Society has an easy-to-use calculator that will give you a specific calorie goal based on gender, age, height, weight, and activity level.
When studies determining the physical activity level of elderly people were evaluated, it was seen that age averages of sampling groups are close to age averages of elder people we included into our study.
Only the source manikin has a high activity level in the high activity case.
While it is common practice at the yard to adjust the temporary workforce to existing activity levels, no decision has been made to let people go next year.
The researchers set out to determine whether meeting the 2008 physical activity guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services would translate into better overall quality of life and whether interventions to improve physical activity level correlate to better quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs).
Physical activity levels have been assessed among children and adolescents in different parts of the world.
The Pool Activity Level (PAL) instrument for occupational profiling; a practical resource for carers of people with cognitive impairment, 4th ed.
Specimens in which the factor V activity level was less than 50% (11 of the original 83 specimens) were presumed to be from patients with liver disease and hence excluded from the data analysis.
Physical activity level of men was significantly higher than that of women in the work domain (p=.
In all, 39% of girls and 18% of boys were inactive--80% of their parents wrongly thought their child to be sufficiently active and 40% of these children overestimated their activity level.
For instance, in a longitudinal study by Telama and Yang (2000) that investigated the decline in physical activity between the ages of 9 to 27 in Finland, a remarkable decline in physical activity level was observed after the age of 12.