actor

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Actor

(language)
An object-oriented language for Microsoft Windows written by Charles Duff of the Whitewater Group ca. 1986. It has Pascal/C-like syntax. Uses a token-threaded interpreter. Early binding is an option.

["Actor Does More than Windows", E.R. Tello, Dr Dobb's J 13(1):114-125 (Jan 1988)].

actor

(programming)
In object-oriented programming, an object which exists as a concurrent process.

actor

(operating system)
In Chorus, the unit of resource allocation.

actor

see SOCIAL ACTOR.

What does it mean when you dream about an actor?

ACTOR

In Jungian psychology, the persona—the side of ourselves that we present to the world—is portrayed as an actor. Unless we are somehow involved in actual acting or have unrealized ambitions to act, dreams in which we or others appear as actors tend to refer to the persona. As with other symbols, much depends on the overall tone of the dream. When they are unpleasant, acting dreams frequently refer to situations in which we feel forced to “put on an act” or situations in which we feel ourselves acting out the expectations of others.

actor

(1) A primitive in a concurrent programming model. See actor model.

(2) (ACTOR) An earlier Windows object-oriented programming language for PCs developed by The Whitewater Group Inc., Evanston, IL.

Actor

(dreams)
Sometimes dreaming about a famous actor or actress may be a wish-fulfilling dream, or it could hold important messages about ourselves. We admire celebrities and may wish to have some of their characteristics. Consider the personality traits or any other trait that attracts you to that person. This will help you figure out why you are dreaming about him or her. If you are dreaming that someone is acting, you may be dreaming about yourself. The dream could be pointing out some of the roles that you play in life. Among the many roles we play are parent, spouse, lover, student, professional, etc. We behave somewhat differently in each of those roles. The actor in your dreams could be showing you how well you “play” some of your roles in life or how others perceive you.
References in classic literature ?
I tramped through the puddles and under the showery trees, mourning for Marguerite Gauthier as if she had died only yesterday, sighing with the spirit of 1840, which had sighed so much, and which had reached me only that night, across long years and several languages, through the person of an infirm old actress. The idea is one that no circumstances can frustrate.
We had neither of us read the play, and we did not know what it was about--though I seemed to remember having heard it was a piece in which great actresses shone.
"But I really don't know which of my actions is the worst," said the lively actress.
Everybody felt that the difficulty lay here -- everybody saw the difficulty conquered -- everybody echoed the manager's enthusiasm at rehearsal, which had hailed her as a born actress.
We are going to try and persuade Madame to tell us about her new play," she concluded, smiling at the French actress, "and there are so many of my friends on the French stage whom I must hear about."
The victim was a popular actress; the accused was a popular actor; and the accused had been caught red-handed, as it were, by the most popular soldier of the patriotic season.
In an Oscar "recall" asking Hollywood's elite to cast votes for their favorite film, actor, actress and director in hindsight, Shohreh Aghdashloo was named as Best Supporting Actress in 2003 for her role in "House of Sand and Fog,"
But it's played more than 40 festivals, earning an armful of awards along the way, including Gaidry's Outstanding Actress honor at Outfest, the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Film Festival.
After several crossed wires, attempts to reschedule and hopes almost dashed, one can't be faulted for thinking that the acclaimed actress would really rather not talk today.
But if the premise of Portrait of an Image was to capture an assortment of major characters Huppert has portrayed on screen--Erika Kohut in Michael Haneke's Piano Teacher (2001), Marie in Claude Chabrol's Story of Women (1988), Beatrice in Claude Goretta's The Lacemaker (1977), to name only three--the parenthetical credit the actress receives suggests that Horn views her participation as something of a cameo performance, a "cameo" perhaps in the sense that she lends only the gemlike relief through which the otherwise invisible and therefore external personae enter into the picture.
Next time you spot your favorite actor, actress or professional athlete in the media, take a closer look at his or her best features--chances are they're insured.
She has a playful side, but she only shows it after she's sure you understand she's an actress of substance.