acute cerebellar ataxia

acute cerebellar ataxia

[ə′kyüt ‚ser·ə′bel·ər ə′tak· sē·ə]
(medicine)
A severe childhood syndrome of sudden onset characterized by muscular incoordination, impaired articulation, oscillations of the eyeballs, and decreased intraocular pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of 20 patients of neurological manifestation 60% cases had encephalopathy.9 Although acute cerebellar ataxia is rare complication we had two patients with this complication constituting (10%) of total neurological complication.
(9) reported acute cerebellar ataxia in 16 (14%), meningoencephalitis in 10 (9%), CNS complications in 26 (23%), and febrile convulsions in nine patients (8%).
There is a higher risk of complications in males, smokers, pregnancy and immunodeficient individuals.1 Neurological complications develop in up to 0.03% of the cases.2 The main neurological syndromes are encephalitis, acute cerebellar ataxia, myelitis and meningitis.
Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) is described as a clinical syndrome of acute onset of cerebellar dysfunction, with good long-term prognosis.
Mitchell, "Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome," Journal of Child Neurology, vol.
The most common causes are post-infectious acute cerebellar ataxia, toxin ingestion and Guillain-Barre syndrome.
Rare presentations are heapatosplenomegly aseptic meningitis, acute cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis.
Clinical syndromes included 26 cases of acute cerebellar ataxia, 17 of encephalitis, 16 isolated seizures, 10 strokes, 10 cases of meningitis, 2 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, 2 cases of acute disseminated
Cerebellitis, or acute cerebellar ataxia, is an inflammatory process of the cerebellar white matter that occasionally is manifested after systemic viral or bacterial infections (8).
Neurological complications are relatively rare in chicken-pox.(1)(2)(3) Acute cerebellar ataxia is the most common, occurring in about one in 4000 varicella cases among children younger than 15 years of age.(1)
The most common causes are postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia, toxin ingestion and Guillain-Barre syndrome.
Initial diagnoses were viral meningitis (60 patients), encephalitis (20), acute cerebellar ataxia (12), acute transverse myelitis (1), and Guillain-Barre syndrome (1).
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