ADAPT

(redirected from adapted)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

ADAPT

(language)
A subset of APT.

[Sammet 1969, p. 606].

adapt

To make suitable for a particular purpose or new requirements or conditions, by means of modifications or changes.
References in periodicals archive ?
With this prospective an attempt has been made to investigate the cross-adaptation mechanism for salinity tolerance in adapted and unadapted cell lines of Oryza sativa .
The paperwork involved for specially adapted housing can be very cumbersome.
Jean Skinner, who is adapted aquatics supervisor for the Fairfax County Park Authority, organizes the exercise classes and recruits and trains all the instructors.
Eventually, Lee Miller Parks, the college's adapted physical education specialist, would like to offer skiing, horseback riding and camping for the disabled.
According to the National Consortium for Physical Education and Recreation for Individuals with Disabilities (NCPERID), "Qualified teachers with appropriate state-approval, certification, license, or credential in adapted physical education should plan, implement, and evaluate physical education instruction for students with disabilities.
Low ropes course elements can be adapted to universal design by using additional spotters, making minor construction changes, or utilizing specialized equipment.
As with any computerized system, software must be adapted to your environment and rely upon accurate information, in both design and execution, to provide accurate results.
The next step is to ensure that this company culture be defined as one which can be easily modified and adapted accordingly to cultures worldwide.
It can take farmers several years to expand their stocks of locally adapted seeds.
Cottonwood, green ash, sycamore, silver maple, pecan: According to Hershey, these species, which have adapted to the floodplain over time, are faring pretty well.
Whether these methods can be adapted to the health care industry has remained uncertain.
O'Brien and Stephen Fugita try answering the key question: Why have Japanese Americans adapted into American culture, while maintaining their own ethnic and cultural heritage?