ADAPT

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ADAPT

(language)
A subset of APT.

[Sammet 1969, p. 606].

adapt

To make suitable for a particular purpose or new requirements or conditions, by means of modifications or changes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "Adapting to Alzheimer's: Support for When Your Parent Becomes Your Child" is thoroughly 'reader friendly' from beginning to end and will prove to be an invaluable, practical, and comforting read for anyone charged with (or anticipating) having to care for an loved one with Alzheimer's.
I'm good at adapting, so it's easy for me to suss out a situation and adapt to it.
The change also allows for a Temporary Resident Adaptation (TRA) grant to assist a veteran in adapting a family member's home to meet the veteran's special needs.
Multiple insights were developed for an environment of change that included a need to accept, value, and adapt to new group members, that communication was a key element when adapting, that leadership was needed when working through change, and that change impacted on one's time.
Midnight at the Dragon Cafe is a quietly lyrical coming-of-age novel about a young girl who is adapting and thriving while watching her family struggle to maintain their cultural identity as they impotently fight against racism and poverty.
Similarly, Duarte warned that adapting and translating American career measures for use in other countries raise a host of questions concerning the final product (i.e., a test that is ready for use in a different country, in a different language, and for a different culture).
An absolute "must-read" for economists; regardless of whether one agrees or disagrees with the recommendations proffered, the current and impending troubles of adapting to globalization are unquestionably real and can be ignored only at America's peril.
This implies adapting the close physical environment to provide safety and enable mobility and accessibility for physically impaired older people.
Adapting front-drive to propel both the front and rear wheels would seem to be the smart answer for many automakers, but it may not be enough to pull their luxury models even with the image leaders.
Is there any shame in the fact that our metalcasting businesses have had a tough time keeping up with the changes and adapting to a stronger position?

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