adaptive divergence

adaptive divergence

[ə′dap·tiv də′vər·jəns]
(evolution)
Divergence of new forms from a common ancestral form due to adaptation to different environmental conditions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although diversity evolves at both higher and lower levels in the hierarchy of life, the adaptive divergence of reproductively isolated populations to form new species is fundamentally important because this process can set groups of organisms onto independent evolutionary trajectories from which they can no longer influence each other directly through mating and recombination.
Hence, studies on how these organisms adapt to such environmental regimes could provide an opportunity for exploring not only the process of adaptive divergence of organisms to estuarine habitats from ancestral environments, but also the incipient driver of the divergence.
Nonetheless, many snakes are so similar on their morphological patterns that it becomes really difficult to distinguish any adaptive divergence that may exist.
Adaptive divergence in body size may lead to premating isolation by one of three routes.
Character displacement and the adaptive divergence of finches on islands and continents.
(1985) suggested that the lake-stream pairs on Graham Island had evolved independently by parallel adaptive divergence in the two-drainage systems.
Adaptive divergence of trophic phenotype among freshwater populations of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).
256), he noted that the sterility or inviability of hybrids can result from adaptive divergence alone.
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