addressee


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

addressee

(communications)
One to whom something is addressed. E.g. "The To, CC, and BCC headers list the addressees of the e-mail message". Normally an addressee will eventually be a recipient, unless there is a failure at some point (an e-mail "bounces") or the message is redirected to a different addressee.
References in periodicals archive ?
An unconditional, full-fledged democratization process in which all Kurdish citizens are taken as an addressee will produce quicker and more successful results than the talks with the terrorist PKK.
The use of adverb please in (8) makes it explicit that the piece of advice is given only because it is the speaker's belief that the action will be beneficial for the addressee and that the addressee is free to decide whether or not to carry out the action.
The addressee is under the obligation to act as commanded.
The second is a pragmatic factor--namely, that the whole statement is delivered, as a statement of Pip's false idea, on the assumption that the falseness of this idea will be understood by the addressee not only because its obvious falsity is explicitly commented on but also because the addressee will recognise (and corroborate) its falsity by comparing it with already possessed knowledge of what the truth was.
What is curious here is the addressee is warned not to be asked (how can he control that?
on May 15, 2007, to the authority in the United States with jurisdiction to notify such a document, that authority having acknowledged its receipt on May 23, 2007; the said authority did not transmit it to MYSPACE, its only addressee.
Accountability gaps -- where the speaker and addressee misunderstand each other regarding their respective responsibilities associated with the communication
Where the addressee needs to get back in touch, offer a stimulus for an early response, possibly a discount or free gift.
The rhetoric, style, and tone of a letter correspond to the addresser's perception of his or her status in relation to the addressee.
In what follows I overview these ways with reference to how argumentation may pressure addressees to accept an argument's conclusion.
Thus, when the addressee is involved in any kind of communicative act, he will have to select the interpretation which gives greater contextual effects in each particular situation because this is the easiest way to adjust to both the immediate context and the encyclopedic knowledge of the addressee.
The addressee collected the package with police officers and it was found to contain a pair of shoes.