address

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address

1. Computing a number giving the location of a piece of stored information
2. Brit Government a statement of the opinions or wishes of either or both Houses of Parliament that is sent to the sovereign
3. the alignment or position of a part, component, etc., that permits correct assembly or fitting

Address

 

in computers, a code specifying the location of information in an electronic computer. True addresses are specific codes corresponding to numbers (of a unit or device) of data storage locations. Relative addresses are numbers of memory locations counted from some specially selected location, which is most often the one in which the instruction containing the relative address is stored. Symbolic addresses are those used for convenience in programming. Relative and symbolic addresses are converted into true addresses either manually, after the entire program has been written and checked, or automatically within the computer by special programs. In the computer, the address is converted by a decoder into a system of control signals which give access to the storage locations corresponding to the given address. Most computers have capabilities for circuit conversion of the address while an instruction is in the process of being carried out. An address arriving at a decoder is called an input address, and an address extracted from the computer memory as part of an instruction is called an output address, or simply an address.

address

[′ad·res]
(computer science)
The number or name that uniquely identifies a register, memory location, or storage device in a computer.

address

(networking)

address

(networking)

address

(networking)

address

(storage, programming)
An unsigned integer used to select one fundamental element of storage, usually known as a word from a computer's main memory or other storage device. The CPU outputs addresses on its address bus which may be connected to an address decoder, cache controller, memory management unit, and other devices.

While from a hardware point of view an address is indeed an integer most strongly typed programming languages disallow mixing integers and addresses, and indeed addresses of different data types. This is a fine example for syntactic salt: the compiler could work without it but makes writing bad programs more difficult.

address

(1) The number of a particular RAM or peripheral storage location. Like post office boxes, each byte of RAM and each sector on a drive has its own unique address. Programs are compiled into machine language, which references actual addresses in the computer. See address bus and machine language.

(2) As a verb, to manage or work with. For example, "the computer can address 16GB of RAM."

(3) The location of a website or other Internet facility. See URL, IP address and address bar.
References in periodicals archive ?
The drivers who used three-word addresses drove for four hours and 28 minutes, covered a distance of 198 km, and made no phone calls to customers.
The matter is exacerbated if the anonymous blogger logs on to the Internet from a business because there may be two IP addresses to track down: 1) the IP address assigned to the business by the Internet service provider (i.e., a public IP address); and 2) the IP address assigned by the business to the employee's office computer (i.e., a private IP address).
This protocol addresses how two hosts can connect with each other and exchange information.
* In areas with non-city-style addresses (e.g., rural route and box number or post office box numbers), the LUCA liaisons will provide input regarding the count of housing unit and group quarters addresses.
Addresses of the mid-1980s up to 1990 get specific about certain tribunal abuses.
In a registration attack, a spammer registers large numbers of e-mail addresses with a variety of web sites to determine which addresses are valid, and can then match an address with a web site.
The software, which complements current Multi-Line Optical Character Readers (MLOCR), validates addresses and assigns correct 11-digit zip codes to increase mail processing accuracy.
Chapter 2, contributed by Ranson, Beaglehole, Correa, Mirza, Buse and Drager, addresses "the public health implications of multilateral trade agreements." Chapter 3, titled "Globalisation and multilateral public-private health partnerships: issues for health policy," has been contributed by Buse and Walt, whereas chapter 4, contributed by Brugha and Zwi, asks questions for evidence in favor of "global approaches to private sector provision." Chapter 5, titled "Regulation in the context of global health markets," has been contributed by Kumaranayake and Lake, and chapter 6, titled "Global policy networks: the propagation of health care financing reform since the 1980s," has been contributed by Lee and Goodman.
They can allow users to maintain their own personal "white list" of legitimate e-mail addresses, maintain a personal "blacklist" of blocked e-mail addresses or access community white lists or blacklists of known SPAMmer e-mail addresses.
The most successful applicants will take an integrated approach that addresses in a scientifically sound manner aspects within the continuum of PM sources to effects.
Brian Camenker, organizer of the Article 8 Alliance, sees the constitutional amendment route as not only impractical, but also flawed, since it addresses only the effects of the problem rather than the problem itself.
Not only can crooks forge the addresses of fraudulent sites that users are enticed to visit, they have also been able to copy the small padlock graphic that guarantees "secure" transactions.