address

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address

1. Computing a number giving the location of a piece of stored information
2. Brit Government a statement of the opinions or wishes of either or both Houses of Parliament that is sent to the sovereign
3. the alignment or position of a part, component, etc., that permits correct assembly or fitting
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Address

 

in computers, a code specifying the location of information in an electronic computer. True addresses are specific codes corresponding to numbers (of a unit or device) of data storage locations. Relative addresses are numbers of memory locations counted from some specially selected location, which is most often the one in which the instruction containing the relative address is stored. Symbolic addresses are those used for convenience in programming. Relative and symbolic addresses are converted into true addresses either manually, after the entire program has been written and checked, or automatically within the computer by special programs. In the computer, the address is converted by a decoder into a system of control signals which give access to the storage locations corresponding to the given address. Most computers have capabilities for circuit conversion of the address while an instruction is in the process of being carried out. An address arriving at a decoder is called an input address, and an address extracted from the computer memory as part of an instruction is called an output address, or simply an address.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

address

[′ad·res]
(computer science)
The number or name that uniquely identifies a register, memory location, or storage device in a computer.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

address

(networking)

address

(networking)

address

(networking)

address

(storage, programming)
An unsigned integer used to select one fundamental element of storage, usually known as a word from a computer's main memory or other storage device. The CPU outputs addresses on its address bus which may be connected to an address decoder, cache controller, memory management unit, and other devices.

While from a hardware point of view an address is indeed an integer most strongly typed programming languages disallow mixing integers and addresses, and indeed addresses of different data types. This is a fine example for syntactic salt: the compiler could work without it but makes writing bad programs more difficult.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

address

(1) The number of a particular RAM or peripheral storage location. Like post office boxes, each byte of RAM and each sector on a drive has its own unique address. Programs are compiled into machine language, which references actual addresses in the computer. See address bus and machine language.

(2) As a verb, to manage or work with. For example, "the computer can address 16GB of RAM."

(3) The location of a website or other Internet facility. See URL, IP address and address bar.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
With this difference in mind, Green (1982: 130) argues that obligatory XVS structures triggered by here, there, now and then are typical oral-language constructions because their use is subject to the restriction that there must be an interaction between addressor and addressee in the communicative event.
Explain the relationship between the addressor and addressee in terms of cooperativeness and politeness principles.
referent, the addressor, and the addressee) are situated as well as
In (8a) the use of the distal demonstrative shows the addressor's intention to present Wendy's words as distant in time.
Not only, then, must addressor and addressee be implicated in the textual production of truth, but the truth that is so produced is a function of their unique and finite co-implication, and so is not generalizable.
In this regard, one language game speaks its rules for another, and in the new game that emerges it is the addressor speaking to an addressee rather than an addressee listening that dominates (Segal, "Language" 212; see also Segal, "Postmodernism").
In order to use the proper name correctly, however, Kripke asserts that it is necessary that the addressee who in turn hears it uses it to mean the same thing as was intended by the addressor from whom it was heard; in this way it is linked onto in a correct manner (and maintains its sense).
Address to a tu with whom the addressor shares a past.
You neutralize the addressor, the addressee, and the sense of the testimony; then everything is as if there were no referent (no damages).(200)
Imposing phrases such as 'instigative addressor', 'plenary presence', 'cynegetic custom', and 'leonine adjuvant' abound.
A signature as proof of a signer or addressor seems to authorize and guarantee.