Insult

(redirected from adds insult to injury)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.

Insult

 

under Soviet criminal law, the intentional lowering of a person’s honor and dignity, expressed in unseemly form. The insult may be given orally, in writing, by gestures, or by actions, and it may be given either publicly, in the presence of the victim, or not in his presence (in which case the insult is recognized as a crime only if the accused wanted his insulting statements to become known to the victim or knowingly permitted them to become known). Insult is punishable by corrective labor for a term not exceeding six months, by a fine of up to 50 rubles, by compelling the guilty person to rectify the harm done, or by public censure. If the act was of a minor nature, measures of social pressure may be applied, including turning the case over to a comrades’ court. Greater liability has been established for an insult in print or an insult committed by a person previously found guilty of insult (if the record of conviction has not been canceled). A criminal case involving insult is initiated only on the complaint of the victim (private accusation) and may be terminated if the parties make peace before the court retires to render judgment.

Soviet criminal law provides for increased liability for insulting a representative of the government or a representative of the public who is fulfilling duties for the protection of public order, a militiaman, or a people’s guard (for example, arts. 192 and 1921 of the Criminal Code of the RSFSR).

References in classic literature ?
nobody will ever admire you till you get rid of your rough, awkward manners.
I respect and admire Miss Emily; and I have tried, in my poor way, to be of some little service to her.
When you are more used to Tommie, Miss Pink, you will understand and admire him.
If our reason leads us to admire with enthusiasm a multitude of inimitable contrivances in nature, this same reason tells us, though we may easily err on both sides, that some other contrivances are less perfect.
Here, however, she thought she might have launched forth with safety; and the sagacious reader will not perhaps accuse her of want of sufficient forecast in so doing, but will rather admire with what wonderful celerity she tacked about, when she found herself steering a wrong course.
Who can but admire this quality of gratitude in an unprotected orphan; and, if there entered some degree of selfishness into her calculations, who can say but that her prudence was perfectly justifiable?
I learned, from the views of social life which it developed, to admire their virtues and to deprecate the vices of mankind.
One of the things I most admire in Stephen is that he makes a greater friend of Philip than any one.