adhesion bond

adhesion bond

The adhesion of mortar or grout to masonry units.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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It has an adhesion bond strength on multiple substrates--including FR4 laminate--of 18kg.
To measure adhesion bond strength to substrate, samples of each composite were molded for four minutes at 180[degrees]C to a 1" (25.4 mm) wide stainless steel substrate coated with and without a primer developed at Vernay using a special compression mold (refs.
During the pull-off adhesion bond strength test, the concrete broke apart before DuraGrade lost adhesion.
The adhesion bond strength between soft and hard component of the demonstrator part was studied, for different gating techniques and processing temperatures of the soft component.
Among them the surface free energy method is most popularly used to investigate the adhesion bond between aggregate and asphalt binder [6-9].
This article discusses the basic science--contact angles, surface wetting, and chemical activation--behind achieving strong adhesion bond strength.
The adhesion bond between the composite and the primer did not fail during the test, nor did the adhesion bond between the primer and the steel substrate.
The adhesion test results categorize the adhesion bond and its quality of the material.
To measure adhesion bond strength to the steel substrate, ASTM D3654 for measuring the ability of a pressure sensitive tape to adhere to a standard steel panel under constant stress was used, but instead of pressure sensitive tape, the composite was molded to the panel.
Once a good primary adhesion bond is established, the accelerated environmental testing will evaluate the adhesive's performance.
In analogous tests with surface-modified strips of rubber, bond strength exceeds 150 Ib./inch; the rubber tears before the adhesion bond fails.
They are one of the hardest coatings and form a hard, smooth surface that will resist chipping, peeling or cracking, and form one of the strongest surface adhesion bonds. They are difficult to rework and require a soldering iron to penetrate the coating when replacing a component.