adiabatic


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adiabatic

[¦ad·ē·ə¦bad·ik]
(thermodynamics)
Referring to any change in which there is no gain or loss of heat.

adiabatic

Occurring without the gain or loss of heat.

adiabatic

adiabaticclick for a larger image
Examples of adiabatic heating and cooling when a piston moves up and down in a cylinder.
Thermally insulated or self-contained (i.e., without heat entering or leaving the body).
References in periodicals archive ?
This system sets a new paradigm for CAES that improves the applicability for on-site distributed energy, doesn't use fossil fuel to preheat the air on expansion, increases efficiency and lowers cost of previous adiabatic air storage systems.
The empirically known heat capacity and adiabatic index for all gases are clearly a better fit to this new theory/model, when compared to accepted theory.
The term adiabatic logic is used in low-power VLSI circuits which implements reversible logic.
In both cases the use of adiabatic humidification delivered additional benefits through the cooling effects produced by evaporating water, which reduced the need for mechanical cooling in the spaces.
With free cooling, the system automatically shuts down chillers that would otherwise be used for processes and lets the adiabatic cooler provide the chilled water needed.
Avoidance of the risk of proliferation of harmful bacteria, such as Legionella, due to the patented, enclosed design of the adiabatic misting chamber and the absence of stagnant water.
A rise in ambient temperatures activates a part of the system called an adiabatic chamber.
Ultrasonic velocity and density of the binary mixtures along with thermodynamic values such as adiabatic compressibility, free length, and impedance at different concentration were determined.
In terms of manifold temperature uniformity, both good and tough thermal conditions are tested, including effects of viscosity, insulation and non-insulation, adiabatic and conjugate wall.
2009) has revealed that the two-phase flow through adiabatic capillary tube has been modeled successfully by a number of researchers.
Adiabatic coolers rely on mechanical cooling which is supported by 'free cooling' for the majority of the year (97 percent), this means the adiabatic spray system is potentially only utilised for three percent of the year.
In a vapor cycle system, the temperature is increased by adiabatic compression and decreases during adiabatic expansion.