adiabatic flame temperature


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adiabatic flame temperature

[¦ad·ē·ə¦bad·ik ¦flām ′tem·prə·chər]
(physical chemistry)
The highest possible temperature of combustion obtained under the conditions that the burning occurs in an adiabatic vessel, that it is complete, and that dissociation does not occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adiabatic flame temperature of the diesel fuel appeared significantly higher than that of the HVO components in both air and "air-like" conditions.
The theories explain enhanced mixing process by relative velocity between gas and droplet (Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism) and media density difference (Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism) on gas-liquid interface [52, 53] that stimulates a flame temperature in these regions to approach the adiabatic flame temperature values.
The value of these two parameters (adiabatic flame temperature [K], laminar flame velocity [cm/s]) is affected partly by the composition of gaseous fuel.
(1986), theoretical results (Matalon and Mtkowsky 1982; Clavin and Williams 1982; Chung and Law 1988) have shown that, for small stretch, deviation of the flame temperature from the adiabatic flame temperature is given by
in which [T.sub.ad] is the adiabatic flame temperature, and [T.sub.f] is the local flame temperature.
The adiabatic flame temperature decreases with increased EGR rate, and the peak of temperature appears slightly earlier.
i.e., the adiabatic flame temperature. Partial combustion was not considered for SI combustion because the mixture had ideal conditions for flame propagation, and it was assumed that the flame propagated with high combustion efficiency; a partially combusting flame would not propagate as the postcombustion temperatures would not be high enough to drive thermal diffusion.
This is due to the peak of adiabatic flame temperature under slightly rich condition [12] which generates the fastest pressure rise and enhances burning rate.
In particular unburnt mixture density [[rho].sub.u] at reference temperature of 294 K was found to be 1.115 kg/s, thermal diffusivity 1.0E-5[m.sup.2]/s, and adiabatic flame temperature 1640.00 K.
We see that the adiabatic flame temperature is increased due to the application of the electric field.
The corresponding adiabatic flame temperatures (AFTs) are 1290 K and 1595 K.
Adiabatic flame temperatures are of comparable magnitude for both stoichiometric hydrogen-air and gasoline (analogously isooctane)-air mixtures; Verhelst and Wallner (2009) [15] report values of 2390 K for stoichiometric hydrogen-air and 2276 K for stoichiometric isooctane-air (both values at 300 K and 1 atm initially).
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