adiabatic saturation temperature

adiabatic saturation temperature

[¦ad·ē·ə¦bad·ik ‚sach·ə′rā·shən ‚tem·prə·chər]
(analytical chemistry)
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The temperature of the wet particle surface is the adiabatic saturation temperature, which in the case of water and air is equal to the wet bulb temperature.
Higher temperatures result in faster drying in this region because the adiabatic saturation temperature of the air is higher and it can carry more water from the bed.
Before 25 minutes, the air reaching this depth is saturated, and the temperature is near the adiabatic saturation temperature. At 25 minutes, the wood at this point begins to dry, and at 95 minutes, it is dry.
Both the true wet-bulb temperature and the measured wet-bulb temperature are closely related to the adiabatic saturation temperature. For the purpose of this research, it is imperative to completely understand the difference between these three quantities.
Wet-bulb temperature measurements were taken with the wet-bulb temperature sensor ("measured" wet-bulb temperature) over the entire range of test conditions and compared to the "true" wet-bulb temperature and adiabatic saturation temperature measurements, determined from the chilled mirror dew-point hygrometer.
The measured wet-bulb temperature was also compared to the adiabatic saturation temperature (rather than the true wet-bulb temperature).
The reason that the measured wet-bulb temperature is a better predictor of the adiabatic saturation temperature than the true wet-bulb temperature is because the adiabatic saturation temperature is larger than the true wet-bulb temperature by an amount that is almost exactly compensated for by the error associated with the parasitic heat transfer to the sensor.
Based on the model prediction, there are two ways in which to center the experimental data (shown in Figure 16) on the adiabatic saturation temperature, allowing the measured wet-bulb temperature to predict the adiabatic saturation temperature to within [+ or -] 0.05[degrees]C ([+ or -] 0.09[degrees]F).
At equilibrium, the outlet air temperature would be same as the adiabatic saturation temperature of inlet air, which could be taken from psychometric charts (Keey, 1978).