adipose

(redirected from adiposity)
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Related to adiposity: adiposity rebound

adipose

1. of, resembling, or containing fat; fatty
2. animal fat

adipose

[′ad·ə‚pōs]
(biology)
Fatty; of or relating to fat.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the focus is on excess adiposity as increasing the risk of insulin resistance and its consequences, rather than on a specific value of WC as having some unique clinical significance, it is not clear to me whether it makes a great deal of difference if you measure BMI or WC.
Recombinant mouse OB protein: evidence for a peripheral signal linking adiposity and central neural networks.
These babies have neonatal adiposity and subsequently are being injured during the birth process.
To evaluate the direct effect of exposure to air pollution on adiposity, models for triceps and subscapular skinfolds were further adjusted for the results of a 2-hr postload plasma glucose test (Fleisch et al.
Proposed hypotheses for how breads impact adiposity differently are:
In this study, however, "the association actually became stronger when we adjusted for the adiposity of the infant," he said.
The research found that the gut-specific bacterial enzyme, BSH, is capable of directing local and systemic gene-expression profiles in metabolic pathways that influence weight gain and adiposity in the host.
For the clinician, the atypical subtype deserves particular attention, because this subtype is a strong predictor of adiposity," Dr.
In comparison, higher fitness levels were associated with reduced adiposity and metabolic measures.
Analyses of population-level dietary surveys have confirmed this trend in children for both in- and out-of-home eating, and a plethora of observational evidence positively associates portion size, energy density and adiposity in children.
Apart from the presence of a TV in the child's bedroom, studies examining the influence of other forms of electronic screen devices on adiposity and movement behaviours are scarce.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Children who consistently receive less than the recommended hours of sleep during infancy and early childhood have increases in both obesity and in adiposity or overall body fat at age 7.