administrivia


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Related to administrivia: administrative, Administrative Assistant

administrivia

(ADMINIStrative TRIVIA) The inordinate amount of technical detail required to manage a local area network (LAN) in a large company.
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If administrative tasks cannot be outsourced, streamlined or automated, every member of an in-house team shoulders more administrivia and handles less legal work.
Our time in community can get eaten away by administrivia, or it can be used to create meaningful dialogue, consistent recognition of good work, and constructive conversation about critical issues facing staff.
The most immediate results of the alignment process will be more time on task as determined by the administrative team, and less attention given to administrivia and that which is immediate, but ultimately unimportant.
It is also a very good resource that will remind us about our core business--well removed from the overwhelming administrivia that has overtaken much of our working lives.
So a lot of the underwriters themselves are performing what I call these administrivia tasks with the aid of technology," he says.
That's partially because I ignored the warnings from colleagues about just how much administrivia there'd be to reckon with, from coordinating with IT to working with accounting.
A lot of HR department staff and leaders choose to get so wrapped up in daily administrivia, and then get so bogged down and don't take the time to strategize, says Mike New, vice president of HR at Saint Michael's College (Vt.
In particular, administrivia is made up of detail work, necessary but not sufficient for a successful, profitable organization.
Many of the mundane operations that once relegated the HR director to being a custodian of such administrivia as defined contribution and benefits administration, health ant welfare benefits, and relocation services can now be outsourced, freeing up time to concentrate on strategic functions, such as recruiting and retaining talent, training and development, organization design and execution.
On the one hand, we have the picture of the overworked, underpaid and undervalued victim principal hemmed in by administrivia and subject to sudden death accountabilities.
Teachers made many specific and general suggestions, ranging from such administrivia as the inclusion of computer disks in students' stationery orders to more substantial pleas for greater democracy in decisions about the technology.