admissible

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admissible

Law (esp of evidence) capable of being or bound to be admitted in a court of law

admissible

(algorithm)
A description of a search algorithm that is guaranteed to find a minimal solution path before any other solution paths, if a solution exists. An example of an admissible search algorithm is A* search.
References in classic literature ?
Substance, again, does not appear to admit of variation of degree.
Yes, I admit it," said Levin without thinking, and he was conscious immediately that he had said what he did not think.
When they make them rightly, they make them agreeably to their interest; when they are mistaken, contrary to their interest; you admit that?
But the chief cause of our natural unwillingness to admit that one species has given birth to other and distinct species, is that we are always slow in admitting any great change of which we do not see the intermediate steps.
After examining one by one the different theories, rejecting all other suggestions, it becomes necessary to admit the existence of a marine animal of enormous power.
Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?
If it be said they might sometimes gratify him by an acquiescence in a favorite choice, when public motives might dictate a different conduct, I answer, that the instances in which the President could be personally interested in the result, would be too few to admit of his being materially affected by the compliances of the Senate.
It is strong circumstantial evidence, I will admit, but it is not positive proof.
It seems also improper, that one person should execute several offices, which was approved of at Carthage; for one business is best done by one person; and it is the duty of the legislator to look to this, and not make the same person a musician and a shoemaker: so that where the state is not small it is more politic and more popular to admit many persons to have a share in the government; for, as I just now said, it is not only more usual, but everything is better and sooner done, when one thing only is allotted to one person: and this is evident both in the army and navy, where almost every one, in his turn, both commands and is under command.
They differ, in that Epic poetry admits but one kind of metre, and is narrative in form.