adret

adret

[′ad·rət]
(ecology)
The sunny (usually south) face of a mountain featuring high timber and snow lines.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Horowitz had his prooftexts, as did others: first, a responsum of the medieval halakhic authority Rabbi Solomon ben Abraham ibn Adret (Rashba, 123 5-1310) who insisted that the Torah recognizes the performers of mitzvot, and so should later Jewish generations; and second, in the interpretation of a Talmudic story from tractate Bava Bathra.
I started working with the Lyon Opera Ballet in the early 1980s, when Francoise Adret was the director of the company, so it's a long tradition for me.
This constitutes an excellent example of the book's titular theme of "concealment and revelation." Another fascinating aspect of Halbertal's presentation was the quixotic attempt by Abba Mari in the early fourteenth century to rein in more radical Maimonideans, by appealing to Nachmanides' successor Shlomo ibn Adret for support.
As the Rashba, Rabbi Solomon ben Abraham Adret, wrote about 700 years ago when asked to apply a non-Jewish law of inheritance instead of rabbinic law:
El ultimo capitulo de la obra describe el desembarco en la Espana judia del saber de los maestros asquenazies, centrandose en Rabi Asher, un refugiado aleman, y en el rabino mas influyente de la juderia catalana Salomon ben Adret. Con ellos se implantara la vision publica del norte de Europa, mucho menos culto y donde los judios gozaban de menos derechos y libertades.
This clever reading is first cited by a Spanish Jewish scholar, Solomon ben Abraham Adret (known by the acronym Rashba), who lived in mid-thirteenth century.
Rabbi Shlomo Ibn Adret (Rashba) cautions us that the Torah is of primary and paramount importance for the Jewish people.
Our explanation to this point, though compelling in its responsiveness to the constraints of the text, in fact represents the very particular perspective of the rishon, Rashba (Solomon ben Abraham Adret; 1235-1310).