adsorbed water

adsorbed water

1. Water which is held on the surfaces of a material by electrochemical forces; its physical properties are substantially different from those of absorbed water or chemically combined water at the same temperature and pressure.
2. Water which is bound to soil particles as a result of the attraction between electrical charges on their surfaces and water molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
A small peak at 1631 cm-1 is due to deformation vibrations of adsorbed water molecules [13].
Adsorbed water is kind of like a fourth state of matter (Figure 3).
In the plastic package, however, the powder adsorbed water because of the inefficient barrier, and the water easily bound with the low-molecular weight molecules (fructose, glucose and sucrose) present in the juice in powder.
The band observed at 3460 cm-1 and 3437 cm-1 were assigned to O-H stretching vibrations of adsorbed water molecules.
When heated, the desiccant releases its adsorbed water molecules, which are purged to the atmosphere.
Dehydration reactions involving loss of adsorbed water and destruction of structural OH during kaolinite dehydroxylation is considered to have accounted for the observed mass losses.
The hydrated sample was removed, ground in a mortar and evacuated at 260[degrees]C to remove physically adsorbed water from the surface.
It shows that montmorillonite lost about 14% of its original weight up to 120[degrees]C because of the removal of physically adsorbed water then becomes stable till 500[degrees]C.
But results showed that adsorbed water for modified bagasse lower than raw bagasse in same particle size because of modification process with acetic anhydride replaces a hydrophobic functional group in the raw bagasse structure and improve hydrophobic and oleophilic properties of bagasse.
5% adsorbed water and does not require drying prior to compounding.
Smectites are a specific type of clay mineral that expands and contracts with adsorbed water.
1) and Lycatab showed an initial broad endotherm below 100[degrees]C, due to loss of adsorbed water on heating.