advection


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advection

the transference of heat energy in a horizontal stream of gas, esp of air

advection

[‚ad′vek·shən]
(meteorology)
The process of transport of an atmospheric property solely by the mass motion of the atmosphere.
(oceanography)
The process of transport of water, or of an aqueous property, solely by the mass motion of the oceans, most typically via horizontal currents.

advection

A method of heat transfer by horizontal movement of air or fluid. Unlike convection, where heat transfer takes place because of vertical movement, here the horizontal movement is the cause. When cold air comes into contact with warm ground or water, it heats up because of advection.
References in periodicals archive ?
After marking a trough and two ridges on the 850-hPa map, Cole located an area of CAA, stating, "Cold air advection you would have down here because you're crossing your wind heights across the temperature lines." He sought additional regions of CAA: "We still have it crossing ...
Equation (4), namely, advection, can be solved by either a Semi-Lagrangian (Courant et al., 1952) or a first-order upwind scheme.
Over East Asia, CNRM-CM5.1 simulated the prevailing wintertime monsoon-related northerly advection quite well (Figure 6(c)); however, the frequencies of the northwestern and western circulation types were markedly overestimated at the expense of the northeastern circulation type.
The advection velocities of the fluid phase and of the solid matrix are denoted as u and w, respectively.
Advection of a large number of markers placed near the interface is tracked to capture an interface.
In stochastic representation, marked particles undergo advection process by wind at a certain speed and at the same time experience random movement simulating turbulent fluctuation.
The advection and diffusion terms are substituted by using the centered difference in space by
A ten percent ([+ or -] 10%) change in each parameter (e.g., source concentrations, initial concentrations, vertical velocity, and angle of advection) yielded only slight percent differences in the final concentrations of lead.
In the present context, the advection of a turbulent signal from its measurement point [??]AN to a point [[??].sub.c] downwind is schematized in Figure 12.
We now reconsider the local problem examined in Section 2 while allowing for the effect of advection. It is suggested in [6] and [7] that advection in a subdiffusive medium can be modeled by adding another fractional derivative term to the basic subdiffusion equation.