adventitious virus

adventitious virus

[‚ad·ven′tish·əs ′vī·rəs]
(virology)
A contaminant virus present by chance in a virus preparation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Infectivity assays are routinely used to screen for the presence of infectious virus contaminants, whether these are nonspecific for the detection of adventitious virus contaminants, or specific for the detection of specific bovine, porcine, murine or hamster viruses.
ATMP production carries the risk of adventitious virus contamination, such as airborne respiratory viruses, that can be introduced by the operators during processing.
Niksa et al., "Systematic evaluation of in vitro and in vivo adventitious virus assays for the detection of viral contamination of cell banks and biological products," Vaccine, vol.
During the course of developing novel virus detection techniques, researchers at the San Francisco Blood Research Systems Institute and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) unexpectedly identified nucleic acids from an adventitious virus in Rotarix [17].
Jones et al., "Viral nucleic acids in live-attenuated vaccines: detection of minority variants and an adventitious virus," Journal of Virology, vol.
The natural immune system is a complex adaptive recognition system, and can protect the body against an adventitious virus. As a type of computation, the natural immune system is a parallel and distributed adaptive system.
Retrospectively, it was determined that the initial BPV inoculum in 1996 only, was contaminated with an adventitious virus and the RSV titer was practically non-existent.
(b) Retrospectively, it was determined that the Parvovirus inoculum in 1996 was contaminated with an adventitious virus. Table 5.
Recent reports of adventitious virus contamination of products and production environments have accentuated the necessity of a holistic approach to virus safety.
(3) Depending on the contaminant (e.g., Reovirus), bioreactor virus contamination may be silent i.e., little/no change in cell viability and other parameters, in which case the production may go to completion, and will likely only be detected during adventitious virus testing of the bulk harvest.
(b)Retrospectively, it was determined that the Parvovirus incolum in 1996 was contaminated with an adventitious virus. Table 5.