aerate


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aerate

To introduce air into soil or water by natural or artificial means.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aerate your lawns Aerate your lawns Plant your cabbages now Plant your cabbages now
Choate plans to aerate and dethatch at the same time, renting the aerator in the morning and the dethatcher in the afternoon.
In the 17 years that Blissful Meadows has been open, owner Gordon Bliss has insisted that the club aerate its greens only once a year and not until late fall, sometimes as late as late November.
A composter's value is in how best it can serve me in its ability to decompose the volume and variety of debris that I generate, at the time I generate it, how convenient it is to use, and the ease with which I am able to mix and aerate the compost and retrieve and store or use the finished product.
Representatives from the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops met on 16 November to reaffirm the Judeo-Christian dialogue and to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Nostra aerate (In our time), the Vatican II document on the Church and non-Christian religions....
Here are three perfect-for-winter young reds that will taste even better if you aerate them.
Farmers have traditionally regarded earthworms as their friends because these burrowers aerate soil and can speed the release of nutrients as they eat fallen leaves.
To relieve this compaction, you can aerate the lawn with a fork pushed into the ground, to a depth of 15cm, at 15cm intervals over the whole area.
A spade tends to compact it, while a fork will aerate it.
The colors--consistently intense, even fulsome, with lots of purples and oranges, like a layered cocktail of wine, sherbet, and nail polish--tend to lighten and aerate at the top of each work, suggesting sky over land.
Remember to re-seed, de-thatch or aerate your lawn right now.