aerial torpedo


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aerial torpedo

[′e·rē·əl tȯr′pēd·ō]
(ordnance)
A torpedo designed or adapted to be launched from a low-flying aircraft into water.
Formerly, the explosive projectile thrown by a trench mortar and designed so as to fall point down.
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Whether carrying 2,000 pounds of bombs or a single aerial torpedo, the Avenger could reach a speed of 271 mph.
This phase culminated in April 1941, when Charles Kettering, now a General Motors Corporation executive, won a contract to fabricate ten aerial torpedoes. Designated as Guided Missile A-1 (GMA1), or "controllable bomb, power-driven," the project was supervised by Col.
In fact, Bennett recalled that he had never even seen an aerial torpedo before Hwachon.
During this period, the squadron earned its new nickname, 'Dambusters', when their Douglas AD-4 Skyraiders delivered precise low-level aerial torpedoes against the heavily defended and strategically positioned Hwachon Reservoir dam May 1,1951.
He was sent to South Africa in 1945 to aid his recovery and to help with the development of aerial torpedos in preparation for the attack on Japan.
It was a time of creative experimentation, as new technologies such as catapults, arresting gear, airborne communications, metal construction, dive bombing, and aerial torpedoes were tested and perfected.
Slung beneath their fuselages were aerial torpedoes, the first time that type of ordnance had been carried into battle since World War II.
This time, around 300 of the Luftwaffe's bombers dropped everything from aerial torpedoes to oil bombs and anti-personnel bombs along with parachute mines which exploded on impact and were capable of taking out entire blocks of houses.
Of particular interest to Airpower History readers will be the chapter on aerial torpedoes. The authors examine the first successful air launch in 1919, development of techniques and technology in the interwar period, and their first operational use on naval aircraft during World War II.
On 1 May 1951, Douglas AD-4 Skyraiders from VA-195--subsequently known as the Dambusters--dropped Mk 13 aerial torpedoes to breach the dam.