aerodynamic control

aerodynamic control

[‚e·ro·dī′nam·ik kən′trōl]
(aerospace engineering)
A control surface whose use causes local aerodynamic forces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leading edge slats are an aerodynamic control surface that extends from the front of the wing.
These slats are aerodynamic control surfaces that extend from the front of the wing during take-off to impart more lift.
Most obvious changes are wider bodywork and much larger front and rear wing elements, which together with revised active aerodynamic control strategies tailored for the demands of track driving.
Among them, [x.sub.2a] represent the aerodynamic control variables, where [mu] is the bank angle, and [alpha] and [beta] are the angle of attack and angle of sideslip, respectively.
Under such conditions the platform behaves like a conventional airplane, and aerodynamic control surfaces, such as rudder, elevator, and ailerons, provide yaw, pitch, and roll motions.
All the aerodynamic surfaces have been revised "in the pursuit of significantly increased downforce", including the addition of much larger front and rear wing elements, together with revised active aerodynamic control strategies tailored for the demands of track driving.
All the aerodynamic surfaces have been revised in the pursuit of significantly increased downforce, including the addition of much larger front and rear wings, together with revised active aerodynamic control for the demands of track driving.
To the extent data are available, the common thread behind the accidents is a crosswind, too much speed on final, touchdown well above stall speed and failure to use all available aerodynamic control on rollout.
Conventional aerodynamic control surfaces are mounted on the wings and twin fins.
"This specific way of generating power could lead to new aerodynamic control mechanisms for drones in the future, inspired by flying animals," Westheim says.