aerodynamic lift


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Related to aerodynamic lift: Aerodynamic drag

aerodynamic lift

[‚e·ro·dī′nam·ik ′lift]
(fluid mechanics)
That component of the total aerodynamic force acting on a body perpendicular to the undisturbed airflow relative to the body. Also known as lift.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wind tunnel investigations on car-body aerodynamic lift have been performed by Joel A.
Most LTA systems, including the BAT, must attain a particular angle of attack in order to guarantee aerodynamic lift. Specifically, since each tether can only assume nonnegative tension, there always exists a range of pitch angles, from [[theta].sub.min] to [[theta].sub.max], outside of which the BAT's shroud cannot maintain static equilibrium.
With envelope buoyancy providing 70 to 80 percent of the required lift and aerodynamic lift providing the remainder, engineers can maximize payload ranges and optimize fuel and speed efficiencies.
However, it does highlight the fact that aeroplanes did fly in the first decades of the 20th century, largely as a result of the work of practical engineers and designers, and despite the theoreticians having an incomplete and flawed understanding of aerodynamic lift.
Network relationships can propel scholars, provide aerodynamic lift, and enable scholarly tailgating.
For example, the textures on the side surfaces don't simply provide the appearance of flow, but actually feed air to the rear brakes, oil cooler, and the transmission cooler; headlamp trim pieces help cut aerodynamic lift. The Aria Group (www.aria-group.com of Irvine, CA) developed the composite panels on the vehicle.
To move more weight, try the Dyanlifter, a blimp/airplane hybrid where part of the load is carried like a blimp and part by aerodynamic lift off the wings and hull.
The makers of this new disc claim its design will maintain its aerodynamic lift and keep it moving forward.
Flaps are special retractable panels on aircraft wings which increase aerodynamic lift. When extended they assist take off and landing.
Aerodynamic lift takes more than half of the aircraft's weight off the water and with a tap on the back-stick energy is translated into flying mode.
At the same time MG have been able to cut aerodynamic lift, which literally tries to make a car fly as speeds increase, by more than 28 per cent.

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