aerodynamic noise

aerodynamic noise

[‚e·ro·dī′nam·ik ′nȯiz]
(acoustics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

aerodynamic noise

Noise resulting from the flow of air; often generated in an air-conditioning system when an airstream encounters protuberances, rough surfaces, and/or blunt edges.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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e menacing snarl of the Ferrari soundtrack echoed through the glens and as a breeze threatened to whip up a mini storm we deployed the new wind deector which cuts air ow in the cabin by a third and also reduces aerodynamic noise.
The menacing snarl of the Ferrari soundtrack echoed through the glens and as a breeze threatened to whip up a mini storm we deployed the new wind deflector which cuts air flow in the cabin by a third and also reduces aerodynamic noise.
Aerodynamic noise arises from the interaction of the airfoils or blades with the wind.
This results in an appreciable reduction in aerodynamic noise in the cabin.A A
A new wind deflector which, when the top is dropped, cuts air flow inside the cabin by 30 per cent and also reduces aerodynamic noise.
Aerodynamic noise reduction is also one of the key issues in modern civil aircraft design in past several decades.
According to the source of the internal combustion engine, the noise can be divided into mechanical noise, combustion noise, and aerodynamic noise [2-4].
The most important source of aerodynamic noise of induction motors is the fan.