aeronaut

(redirected from aeronauts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

aeronaut

[′e·rō‚nȯt]
(aerospace engineering)
A person who operates or travels in an airship or balloon.

aeronaut

aeronaut
Three separate instruments record, on the revolving drum, temperature, pressure, and humidity at the various altitudes, while a fourth (at bottom) marks time interval on the edge of the sheet.
The pilot of an aerostat, especially of a balloon. Also called a balloonist.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aeronauts Joseph Croce-Spinelli and Theodore Sivel wielded a spectroscope from a balloon in 1874, but it wasn't until the 20th century that a complete astronomical telescope made the journey.
H H Jackson Nuneaton Edith Cook deserves an honour ON August 5, I visited Coventry to pay my respects to Miss Edith Maud Cook, the Victorian and Edwardian lady aeronaut, parachutist, and early aviator.
Aeronauts had the unique opportunity to move their readers by description while they themselves were moved, and poets might ascend with them by invoking fancy's powers to intercept an aerial vista.
According to the contract, the interested party is: "from England, originally residents of London but residents at present in this capital." [3] They agree to carry out four balloon ascents in the following way: 1)"with the three aeronauts ascending together in the balloon," 2) "with one of them, at least, mounted on a live horse" provided by the director of the bullring, 3) "taking with them a thirty foot rope to be able to descend with a pyrotechnic machine hanging from the balloon" and 4) "with at least one of the aeronauts mounted on a live bull" [4] also provided by Sr.
When her best friend becomes the latest in a long line of children to go missing, she sets out to rescue him, embarking on a perilous journey that brings her into contact with armoured polar bears, cowboy aeronauts, witches - and a very disturbing experiment.
Several cast members went on to star in similarly historically-themed kids' TV shows like Desert Crusader - about Palestine during the Third Crusade - and The Aeronauts - a drama set among continental fighter pilots.
Much was written about these aeronauts and their adventures and the text is replete with firsthand accounts.
Eisenhower as "if a problem cannot be solved, militarize it." Amidst a national media coverage that portrayed Israeli fire-spraying aeronauts "as if they were combat pilots on duty", he announced the formation of an IAF squadron of specialized aircraft to subdue any future fires, reaffirming faith in the ability of military hardware to solve complex crises.
Fair promoters touted the success and the aeronauts were paraded through main streets throughout the mid-West.
Should we set our words, like aeronauts, inside balloons, or does the lightness of their passage, in a world both violated and violating, betray an impossible position?