aesthesia


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aesthesia

[es′thē·zhə]
(physiology)
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In the "1% silver sulfadiazine" group, silver sulfadiazine was applied to the burn injury every day under ether aesthesia. The injury area was covered with sterile gauze bandage and this process continued for 21 days.
Dr Brian Tehan, clinical director for surgery and an aesthesia in the central division of North Wales NHS Trust, said: "When we have reviewed notes for clinical audits, if there has been a complaint or litigation, we have found that it can be very difficult, if not impossible, to identify the person who is responsible for an entry in the notes.
IF Hippocrates is the father of modern medicine then Liverpool-born Professor T Cecil Gray must be considered one of the fathers of modern an aesthesia.
(b) The letters concerned are different Long E aesthesia (capacity for feeling and sensation) Long I metempsychosize, cyanicide, cytosine (in DNA) Long O adipocellulose, biocoenosis, monopsychosis
I lose aesthesia during the final sprint toward the wobbling horizon and reach the line as a distended form.
All patients had physical signs of DLL), mainly diffuse infiltration of the skin, impairment of sensation (numbness of the dorsal aspects of the extremities, hypaesthesia, or aesthesia), alopecia of eyebrows and eyelashes, anhidrosis, and destructive rhinitis.
Dr Challen had been working as a senior house officer in an aesthesia at the Wythenshawe Hospital in Greater Manchester when the youngsters were admitted on November 2, 2003.