aesthete


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aesthete

[′es‚thēt]
(botany)
A plant organ with the capacity to respond to definite physical stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides offering a compensation for the perception of beauty for Acton as an aesthete, Peking also afforded him an opportunity to achieve a measure of spiritual transcendence.
The section is entitled "Total Waugh: Dandies and Queer Aesthetes on the Home Front." The pun is misleading, since Deer focuses on Ambrose Silk in Put Out More Flags and Basil Seal Rides Again, Anthony Blanche in Brideshead Revisited, and Ludovic and Ivor Claire in Sword of Honour.
The aesthete's total irony, on the other hand, has no specific target: "when the given actuality loses its validity for the ironist in this way, it is not because it is an antiquated actuality that must be replaced by a truer actuality, but because [no actuality is adequate]" (Concept of Irony 283).
CHARLES Duff will tomorrow bring to life the figure of Plas Newydd's Honourable Steven Tennant, poet, artist, novelist and aesthete and lover of acclaimed war poet, Siegfrid Sassoon.
On the 125th anniversary of its foundation, Bulgari dedicates a watch to this multicultural trailblazer, businessman and aesthete: a watch as extraordinary as him.
Thin sections of the plates of the Pennsylvanian chiton Euleptochiton spatulatus (Hoare, Sturgeon and Hoare 1972) show the pattern and sizes of the aesthete canals.
In this book Grant shows Garvey was a man of contradictions: a self-educated, poetry-writing aesthete and unabashed propagandist, an admirer of Lenin, and a dandy given to elaborate public displays.
Gelder, conflating the aesthete and the dandy, sees an analogy with vampires: "The vampire is itself, of course, a contemplative creature ...
That writer's indictment of dress was heresy to a Woman's World aesthete.
Sir William Macarthur: The Colonial Grandee, Thomas Lang: The Million-plant Man, Daniel Bunce: The Man on the Edge, William Guilfoyle: The Colonial Aesthete, Josiah Mitchell: The Man of the ,Soil and William Ferguson; The Man Who Couldn't See.
The latter is the case, for example, when Maltz characterizes a "missionary aesthete" as "a lover of beauty and a social reformer concerned to improve the material environment of the poor" (27).