aesthetic


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aesthetic

(sometimes US), esthetic
1. connected with aesthetics or its principles
2. a principle of taste or style adopted by a particular person, group, or culture
References in periodicals archive ?
With 75 attendees, the record-breaking response to our first-ever CBCU in Detroit reaffirms the need for a forum where residents and fellows in core aesthetic specialties can learn about the latest aesthetic procedures and practice-management strategies from the best-of-the-best in aesthetic medicine," says Kenneth Beer, M.
The market research report titled India Aesthetic Lasers and Energy Devices Market Outlook to 2019 - Led by Intensifying Demand for Skin Tightening and Body Shaping Devices provides a comprehensive analysis of the various aspects such as market size of the aesthetic lasers market, energy devices market, body shaping and skin tightening market, aesthetic surgeries market, aesthetic skin clinics market.
The Aesthetic Awards close the show each year to honor the best procedural outcomes and innovations by medical aesthetic physicians in the country, as selected by a panel of physician peers.
Attend the IAPAM's Aesthetic Practice Start-Up Workshop (www.
We often think of artworks as having the function, at least typically, of providing for aesthetic experience; they yield or are meant to yield experiences of this characteristic type.
Does this implicit prohibition on practical, eschatological action spur, in response, a vibrant aesthetic response?
Nick McAdoo ("Sibley and the Art of Persuasion") focuses on the involuntary and passive side of aesthetic appreciation, to which "Sibley was sensitive," and on the limits of appeal to rule and principle.
The essence of this book is expressed in its subtitle: The Need for the Aesthetic Tradition in Contemporary Art Theory and Education.
Chapter Three looks closely at the Lewisohn sisters, who became central forces at the Henry Street Settlement House in New York City and later founded the Neighborhood Playhouse to expand upon their aesthetic and social mission.
In other words, are Kingston, Erdrich, and Morrison truly representative practitioners of an identifiable aesthetic in contemporary American ethnic writing - or are they just three women with a common interest in the trickster?
Stunning insights into Renaissance aesthetic theory appeared recently in an unlikely place: the final chapter of Stone by John Sallis, founding editor of Research in Phenomenology and author of six books on contemporary philosophy.
Plato, of course, famously banned poets from his Republic because they sacrificed the "truth" for aesthetic effect.