aesthete

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aesthete

[′es‚thēt]
(botany)
A plant organ with the capacity to respond to definite physical stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
What I am calling a radical aestheticism should not be confused with the aestheticisms that we customarily ascribe to the poets of the second generation.
In blurring the clear line between aestheticism and ethics through his Objectivist work, Reznikoff, according to Fredman, became a pivotal figure in our current revision of the story we tell about modernism, its major players, its tenets, its relationship to modernity.
Accordingly, new aestheticism welcomes the phenomenon that contemporary aesthetics is aware of, and reflective on, oppositional (e.
In chapters one and two, Schaffer discusses how a distinct, female aestheticism originated out of resistance to the hegemony of realism and the marriage plot in particular.
She argues that this play is "avant-garde Symbolist in theme" because of "the emphasis on `style' in the work of art, the idea of correspondence between form (appearance) and content (reality), [and] Aestheticism as the critical force to break through the inert status-quo" (92).
The tension between morality and aesthetics is brought out by the phenomenon of aestheticism.
Contemporary critics of Aestheticism included William Morris and John Ruskin and, in Russia, Leo Tolstoy, who questioned the value of art divorced from morality.
Camp Grounds is a valuable corrective to the blinkered aestheticism that Sontag's essay encouraged.
If The Waste Land does envisage redemption it is surely a redemption that would involve far more than aestheticism.
Understood in terms of the conflict of intellectual disciplines, Aestheticism can be seen to align itself with psychology while the professional literary scholars of the new university schools of English model their work on historiography, whether moralizing or archival.
The most prestigious recent foreign film, "Tous les Matin du Monde" (October Films), also has a religious context, but its success is primarily due to its elegant aestheticism.
Published in England as The Illumination of Theron Ware, this novel scrutinizes the ambiguous character of the awakening of a young Methodist minister to the Higher Criticism of the Bible, Pre-Raphaelite aestheticism, and the New Science.