aetiology

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aetiology

, etiology
1. the study of the causes of diseases
2. the cause of a disease
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aetiology

see ETIOLOGY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Body image dissatisfaction amongst males is said to aetiologically underpin the development of both anorexia nervosa (Waller et al., 2007) and muscle dysmorphia (Grieve, 2007) alike, which may represent opposing pathological extremes along a dimensional spectrum of body image psychopathology (Murray et al., 2010).
Aetiologically, these stenoses were attributed to post-phlebitic changes in 6 patients, May-Thurner syndrome in 1 patient, and were idiopathic in 1 patient (Fig.
Parry's pathology, as written in the scientific appendix, is "an aetiologically heterogeneous disorder" (239).
In contrast to the present study higher isolation rates ranged from 26.9% to 36.2% was detected in aetiologically unexplained asymptomatic infertile women in a WHO study reported the current chlamydial infection in infertile women to be 18-20 per cent.
These kinds of nonart objects are called failed-art objects--nonart objects aetiologically similar to art-objects, diverging only in virtue of some relevant failure.
The results from this study and earlier association studies indicate that OCD resembles other complex psychiatric disorders in being aetiologically heterogeneous.
PSS should be distinguished aetiologically from other subclavian DVTs, which are caused by primary diseases and other known risk factors such as malignant neoplasms, treatment with central venous catheters or pacemakers, or cervical ribs.
Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is aetiologically linked to EBV infection, occurs more frequently in families with MS and in subjects with MS than in the general population.
The causal relationship between onset and improvement with dose reduction suggests that they are aetiologically related.
Aetiologically this is an impossibility however, for one cannot not know a priori which social factor(s) will have causal effect, nor can one prove that certain processes are historically necessary.