affectivity

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affectivity

[a‚fek′tiv·əd·ē]
(psychology)
The state of being susceptible to emotional stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mediated multiple regression has been used to investigate the hypotheses that there is significant association between independent and dependent variables and affective commitment mediates the relationship between perceived organizational support and OCBI/OCBO.
We proposed that because employees with stronger work engagement are usually intrinsically motivated to improve their work skills (Deci & Ryan, 1985), they are more likely to form stronger affective commitment when they perceive the learning opportunities associated with HPWS.
"Seasonal affective disorder is not something to just brush off and tough out," she says.
Motivated from Kahneman's theory, we further proposed that visual information might induce affective ease or affective strain in our brain.
Yanghua Zhang writes, importantly, of the Confucian revival in 21st century China, examining the scholar and television personality Yu Dan's lectures on China Central Television in 2006 on the "affective undertone" of The Analects, looking to Confucianism as a "source of happiness and everyday life in the fast-paced market-oriented" environment of contemporary China (p.
Secondly, despite the fact that affective well-being is an important factor which could enhance teacher work engagement, these findings also have added value to educational management literatures since is no empirical research done to prove this, especially in Malaysian context.
The Turkish version of the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego Auto-questionnaire was used to evaluate affective temperaments of parents.
Students will be given opportunities to design, construct and test affective technologies using sensors and other equipment provided by the University in problem-based learning scenarios.
The (https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/seasonal-affective-disorder/index.shtml) National Institute of Mental Health acknowledges seasonal affective disorder but doesn't consider it a standalone illness.
The present study shows how motor expertise increases individuals' sensitivity to others' affective body movement.