affective disorder


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affective disorder

[ə¦fek·tiv dis′ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
Any of a group of disorders in which there is a prominent and persistent disturbance of mood and a full syndrome of associated symptoms, such as depressive disorders or bipolar disorder. Also known as mood disorder.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Seasonal affective disorder is not something to just brush off and tough out," she says.
Moreover, various experimental researches and clinical trials have revealed the beneficial effect of magnesium supplementation in the clinical symptomatology and the therapeutic response to classical antidepressant drugs, in patients with affective disorders (11).
Get as much natural light as you can if you are fighting seasonal depression or wintertime seasonal affective disorder. If you get home after dark, change your schedule and bndle up for a walk during lunch - the Vitamin D from the sun boosts your energy.
When comparing the treatment effect in patients with and without a positive family history of affective disorders, it was necessary to remove the confounding effect of different types of treatment, so we only included patients treated with duloxetine, currently the most commonly used antidepressant at our two centers.
For more information about Seasonal Affective Disorder, visit the National Institute of Health's MedlinePlus at www.nlm.nih.govimedlineplus/seasonalaffective-disorder.html.
DISCUSSION: The present study assessed the prevalence of bipolar affective disorder in substance use disorder patients, their sociodemographic variables and relationship between the two disorders.
A Canadian randomized controlled trial on effectiveness of light therapy and fluoxetine in patients with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) concluded, that light treatment showed earlier treatment response onset and lower rate of some adverse events relative to fluoxetine but there were no other significant differences in outcome.5
It's Seasonal Affective Disorder. I know my husband has this every winter.
Research has found that as many as one in eight Scots experience problems related to Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), the condition triggered by a lack of bright natural light.
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is an umbrella term for mood disorders that follow a seasonal pattern of recurrence.
Pets apparently want to eat more and exercise less and my veterinary colleagues believe they could be suffering from an animal version of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), caused by a build-up of the hormone melatonin.