afferent


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afferent

[′af·ə·rənt]
(physiology)
Conducting or conveying inward or toward the center, specifically in reference to nerves and blood vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Strichartz, "Susceptibility to lidocaine of impulses in different somatosensory afferent fibers of rat sciatic nerve," Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol.
Researchers have known for years that these afferents respond to skin vibrations, but they studied their responses using so-called sinusoidal waves, which are smooth, repetitive patterns.
Human neuronal control of automatic functional movements: Interaction between central programs and afferent input.
The H-reflex is induced by electrical stimulation of a mixed peripheral nerve which contains both sensory (afferent) and motor (efferent) fibers, such as the tibial nerve, which innervates the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles (important muscles for the execution of many dance movements, as they act to plantar flex the foot).
Its components include: 1) a sensory receptor that detects a stimulus (e.g., heat or pressure) and generates a neuronal impulse; 2) a sensory (afferent) neuron that carries an impulse to the spinal cord or brain; 3) a motor (efferent) neuron conveying an impulse away from the spinal cord or brain; 4) an effector (a muscle, gland, and so on), which responds to the efferent impulse.
The solitary nucleus (the main vagus afferent receptor) is a key structure in somatic-visceral processing, including pain.
When these cells detect this increased NaCl load, they mediate vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole via an unknown messenger substance, resulting in a decrease in the glomerular blood flow, a decrease in [P.sub.GC] and a return of the GFR toward normal.
N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced oscillations in excitatory afferent neurotransmission in the guinea pig cochlea.
TRPA1 presents on afferent nerves, which can detect and react to potentially damage, such as stress, physical and chemical stimuli.
Specialists in ophthalmology and radiology cover examination of the afferent visual system, visual fields, magnetic resonance imaging for the ophthalmologist, transient visual loss/retinal artery occlusion, optic nerve disorders, optic chiasm, retrochiasmal disorders, non-physiologic visual loss, neuro-ophthalmologic examinations--efferent systems, ocular misalignment and other ocular motor disorders, nystagmus, pupil, and orbital disease of neuro-ophthalmic significance.