affine deformation

affine deformation

[ə′fīn ‚dē·fȯr′mā·shən]
(geology)
A type of deformation in which very thin layers slip against each other so that each moves equally with respect to its neighbors; generally does not result in folding.
(mapping)
A deformation in which the scale along one axis, or reference plane, is different from the scale along the other axis, or plane, normal to the first.
References in classic literature ?
They saw the robin carry food to his mate two or three times, and it was so suggestive of afternoon tea that Colin felt they must have some.
The gloomy gardener happened to be ill in bed, and the assistant was at vespers-- as Lutheran Germany calls afternoon tea or its equivalent-- so the nurse filled up the holes as well as she could with mould, burying the crushed and mangled roses, cheated for ever of their hopes of summer glory, and I stood by looking on dejectedly.
Except in the gross material sense of the afternoon tea I made no preparations for Mrs.
Bertha Kircher laughed as evenly and with as little hysteria as though she were moved by the small talk of an afternoon tea.
Assuming the affine deformation of the main chains between the crosslinks in XHDPE around a pulsating bubble and the end-to-end vector of the polymer chain in its equilibrium state is [?
Later, Baumberg [5] found the scheme can be used to determine the affine deformation of an isotropic structure.
An affine deformation assumes that the crosslinks are fixed in space at positions defined by the overall specimen ratio.
Directions of affine deformation vary widely in tree squirrels and ground squirrels, and the only species that share a common direction are two distantly related ground squirrels, Spermophilus lateralis and Sp.
Silicon oil and PTFE tape were used for lubrication during the testing allowing for affine deformation throughout the experiment, which is explained in more detail in previous work by our group [33],
Upon application of a stress, low levels of deformation can occur simultaneously throughout the length of the sample, resulting in affine deformation.
Under affine deformation, the deformation of connecting microchannels is in proportion to the bulk material.
The continuum approach generally assumes affine deformation and thus, is incapable of describing the dispersion mechanism.