afterglow

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afterglow

1. the glow left after a light has disappeared, such as that sometimes seen after sunset
2. the glow of an incandescent metal after the source of heat has been removed
3. Physics luminescence persisting on the screen of a cathode-ray tube or in a gas-discharge tube after the power supply has been disconnected

afterglow

[′af·tər‚glō]
(atomic physics)
(meteorology)
A broad, high arch of radiance or glow seen occasionally in the western sky above the highest clouds in deepening twilight, caused by the scattering effect of very fine particles of dust suspended in the upper atmosphere.
(plasma physics)
The transient decay of a plasma after the power has been turned off.

afterglow

The glow in a material after the removal of an external source of fire to which it is exposed, or after the cessation (natural or induced) of flames.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our previous work [55] it was reported that adding of small amount of oxygen into a low pressure nitrogen plasma afterglow causes an increase of nitrogen atom density.
But in February 2014, a 1.2-meter telescope in Southern California spotted a visible-light flash that brightened dramatically within about an hour, fitting the profile of a burst's afterglow. Sure enough, the next day, astronomers looked back at data from three satellites and found a surge of gamma rays consistent with a burst.
Over the following 10 minutes, RINGO2 collected 5,600 photographs of the burst afterglow while the properties of the magnetic field were still encoded in its captured light.
The study shows that dark bursts must be similar, except for the dusty patches in their host galaxies that obscure most of the light in their afterglows.
This allows Swift to catch afterglows in their brightest early phases, seconds to minutes after the explosion.
Nearly all the afterglows that astronomers have detected come from gamma-ray bursts that arose in galaxies that lie 2 billion to 8 billion light-years away.
Within an hour, astronomers began training ground-based telescopes on the same patch of sky to study the burst's infrared afterglow.
Fortunately, three more short-burst afterglows were detected last summer, one by the HETE-2 instrument and two others by Swift (S&T: December 2005, page 21).
Previous X-ray images had captured a burst's afterglow, but not the burst itself, notes Swift principal investigator Neil Gehrels of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
Nearly 32 hours after the blast, Jochen Greiner of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany, led a group that searched for the explosion's fading afterglow.
Hubble Space Telescope afterglow observations of the July 9th burst are particularly significant.
"Because afterglows fade rapidly, we really had to scramble when we received the alert," Perley said.